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QTC is the recognised training college of the Presbyterian Church of Queensland (PCQ).  Therefore some of our students are candidates for ordination as ministers of the Presbyterian Church of Australia, both from Queensland and also sometimes from other parts of Australia.

Ordination candidates complete a four-year program of study which incorporates the requirements of the QTC Pastor’s Pathway, plus several additional units designed to help them prepare for their particular goal of ordained ministry within a local Presbyterian congregation in Australia.

This page tells you the steps you need to take as part of the application process, what being a candidate involves, and particularly what study is involved.  It is important to bear in mind that within PCQ – as with Presbyterian and Reformed denominations all over the world – primary responsibility for determining suitability for ordination lies not with the theological college but with the leadership of the Presbytery in your area, acting on the recommendation of the Elders (Session) of your local congregation.  

QTC provides theological training for candidates and is keen to help however we can, but it is the Presbytery which as overall responsibility for individual candidates.

To become a candidate you must have been a member of a local Presbyterian congregation for at least six months immediately prior to application.  You need to apply to the Session (comprising the Minister(s) and Elders responsible for your congregation) for written confirmation that this is the case, as well as for a reference indicating their belief that you are a suitable person to be trained for ordained ministry.  Typically the Session will want to speak to interview or speak with you about your candidacy application before writing to the Presbytery.

You next need to apply to a Presbytery (normally the Presbytery in which your church is situated) to be accepted as a candidate for the ministry.  The Presbytery is made up of all of the Presbyterian ministers in your district / region and representative elders from all of the congregations.  Your application should be accompanied by

  • the reference and certification from your Church’s Session,
  • a brief CV including a list of all study undertaken at high school level and above, and
  • either your High School Senior Certificate or transcripts of studies completed at University.

To be accepted as a candidate, you must have either completed Australian Year 12 satisfactorily or have completed an Australian University Degree (or acceptable overseas equivalents, together with demonstrated English proficiency).

The Presbytery will interview you, often through an interview panel or small subcommittee, and if satisfied, will accept you as a candidate for the ministry under their care. This will be subject to certain assessments by the PCQ Committee on Training for the Ministry (CTM).

If you have not already done so, it is a good idea to get in touch with QTC, so they can give you advice on potentially starting study at College, and to talk with you about the requirements of the Candidates Course.

Please contact the faculty for ordination candidacy matters here.

After the Presbytery has accepted you, they forward your application to this Committee. The CTM is responsible to ensure that you are trained according to standards laid down by the College Committee of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of Australia. The Committee either confirms your application or refers it back to the Presbytery for further consideration.

On the advice of the Faculty, you will be graded into a year of the course depending on whether you have previously completed theological study, and how much you have completed.  The CTM will also arrange for you to have two medical assessments and a Police Check, as well as confirm you have a valid Blue Card for working with those under 18. When the Committee has accepted you as a candidate you are then ready to start your course of training as a candidate. (Note that some people, after speaking with their Session and the Faculty, commence studies at QTC as an independent student and then apply for acceptance as a candidate.)

Also included in each year of the Candidates Course is supervised field education, as part of the Field Education Scheme (FES). This normally takes the form of a student minister role in a local Presbyterian congregation under the supervision of a Minister.

Requirements within placements vary according to the student’s training needs and the church they are placed with, however, over the four years of training, students will need to preach and lead services regularly, and demonstrate a capacity to do Word ministry in contexts such as small groups and one-to-one ministry.  

Placements are approved by the Faculty, and so you should speak with the Principal if you have questions, concerns or preferences regarding your placement.  FES students are supported financially by their host church (at a level of approximately $10,000 including a travel allowance in 2015), and it is expected that students will spend around ten hours per week serving as part of their FES placement including preparation time.

If students have any questions in relation to their FES placements, they should contact the QTC Faculty.

Candidates follow a course of study which provides a strong grounding in all of the key areas of theology – the Old and New Testaments, Greek and Hebrew language, Systematic Theology, Church History, Ethics and Apologetics – as well as in areas of practice that are important for ministry, such as preaching, pastoral skills, leadership and Presbyterian church government. The Candidates course involves four years of full-time study (or part-time equivalent) and it is recommended that students complete the course full-time and on campus as part of the college community.

Candidates follow the same course of study as those on QTC’s Four-Year Pastor’s Pathway, with some additional specifications relevant to the needs of Presbyterian Ministry. Normally this means that candidates enrol in one of three combined degrees (the MDiv/GradDipDiv, BTh/BMin or the Bth/DipMin) which represent four years of full-time study.  

Current course plans for candidates are available here:

Candidates’ Course – Commencing Even Years
Candidates’ Course – Commencing Odd Years

A small number of candidates have already completed prior theological studies.  In this situation the Faculty may grant you credit from these towards the candidates course, depending on what you have studied previously and the recommendations of the Presbytery and the CTM regarding your training needs for future Presbyterian ministry. 

The current cross-credit checklist for those who have studied at other ACT Colleges and at Moore College Sydney is available here.  The checklist is revised and approved annually by the national Presbyterian Church’s College Committee, and therefore it is important to make sure that you have read the latest version of the checklist in place immediately before you commence as a candidate.

In addition to the work done at the College, a candidate is required to submit to certain assessments by his Presbytery. These assessments form part of what is called Trials for Licence. The yearly requirements are usually to regularly lead Sunday services, preach, and to submit a piece of written work to the Presbytery.  Questions regarding Trials for Licence and other Presbytery requirements should be directed to the Presbytery’s Candidates Committee, or to the Presbytery Clerk.

 

When the College Faculty certifies that all the requirements have been satisfactorily completed, the College Committee issues an Exit Certificate which should be provided to the Clerk of the Candidates’ Presbytery as soon as it has been received.

Once the Exit certificate is issued the Presbytery, if it is still satisfied with the suitability of the person to be a minister, proceeds to “licence” him to preach the gospel. The licentiate is then appointed to an appointment in a local church, although it could be to another kind of ministry.  This appointment is made by PCQ’s Committee on Ministry Resourcing (CMR), which will make arrangements to meet with and interview all candidates in their final year of study at QTC to discuss possible ministry opportunities after college.  PCQ allows for candidates to speak and negotiate directly with ministries which they might potentially serve with after licensing.  However, it is important to remember that such placements may only be taken up if the CMR agrees to exempt the candidate from having their exit appointment made by the CMR itself.  Therefore candidates are strongly encouraged to contact CMR’s Director of Ministry Resourcing as early as practicable if they are likely to request such an exemption.

This all probably seems like a long and complicated process! But it enables candidates to be properly trained and assessed for a vital and challenging role serving God and his people. It gives the candidate confidence that his people have confirmed that under God they believe that his Christian character, doctrine, motivation, and gifts and abilities make him well-suited to the work of serving the Kingdom as an ordained Minister.

Financial Support for Candidates

Full-time candidates at QTC are paid a bursary while in their second, third and fourth years as a candidate.  The level of the bursary varies according to whether the candidate is single or married, how many children they have, and the ages of their children.  In the first (probationary) year of candidacy, which for some students might be their second, third or fourth year of theological study, no bursary is normally provided.  However students may apply to the CTM to be paid a bursary for their first year as a candidate in cases of serious financial need, and where funds are available the committee can decide to provide a bursary.

 

Your next step?

For further information on the Candidates Course, please contact The Committee on Training for the Ministry

Rev. Andrew Purcell [Convener]
Rev Rob Davey [Secretary]

You can view a graphical representation of the Process for Candidating for the Presbyterian Ministry here

PE008 – Philosophy and Christian Thought

Also PE206 – Specialised Studies in Philosophy and Ethics: Philosophy and Christian Thought

This unit introduces students to some of the most significant thinkers and ideas in the history of the western world and explores how they have shaped the world we live in, and sought to bring the Christian message to it. It considers how Christian theology past and present has influenced and been influenced by major philosophical movements and concepts. It also seeks to help students to critically evaluate the thinkers and ideas studied, as well as their influence upon the church and Christian theology.

This unit is taught in intensive mode. It is worth 12 credit points

BB008 – Introduction to Biblical Interpretation

‘Introduction to Biblical Interpretation’ is the foundation of everything we seek to do at QTC. This unit aims to go ‘back to basics’ to ensure that everyone is handling the Bible in a helpful and responsible way before we throw ourselves into the detail of studying the text in earnest. In this unit, you will be introduced to a way of reading and studying the Bible which is coherent, flexible and will shape the way in which you interpret the Bible in every context – whether reading it for personal study or studying the text in order to teach it to others.

We will examine in turn the importance of History, Literature and (Biblical) Theology in reading the Bible, before giving some attention to the way in which this will affect how we seek to communicate the message of any text in the context of the flow of the whole Bible. After completing this unit, every student should be equipped to understand how the Bible fits together, how Jesus Christ is the key to all the Scriptures and how to approach the task of interpreting any part of the Bible.

OT002 – Old Testament Prophets and Writing

Old Testament Prophets and Writings (OT002) and Old Testament Foundations (OT001) form the foundation upon which all further study of the Old Testament
builds. They are thus concerned not so much with the critical issues of Old Testament studies, as with the biblical history as it is recorded in the Old Testament. The study is undertaken in the light of the various ancient contexts of the biblical narrative, illustrated by modern archaeological findings.

Old Testament Prophets and Writings  covers the Prophetic books or Latter Prophets and the wisdom literature of the Old Testament and writings such as Chronicles, Ezra and Nehemiah.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

NT002 – Early New Testament Church

The first section of the unit focuses on the Acts of the Apostles and investigates the history, theology, and features of the early church as it grew, expanded, and matured.

In the second section, students will examine in outline several other New Testament Writings (various Epistles and Revelation) not covered elsewhere in their course.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

NT001 – Jesus and the Gospels

Welcome to the study of the life and teaching of Jesus in the setting of the Gospels. No matter how often we read the Gospels, we always are surprised at some new aspect that emerges from the life of our Lord. I pray that as we progress through this study you will be surprised, challenged and encouraged by what you learn. I am looking forward to being a guide on the journey with you.

This unit entails an introductory study of Jesus’ life and ministry against its background of the world of that time, as it is recorded in the Gospels. This involves a study of the cultural, political, religious and social background of the Gospels. The Gospels as pieces of literature are examined to see what we can learn about how they came into being and consequently how we can read them better. We then study the life and ministry of Jesus, particularly as this is set out by Mark’s gospel. Such topics as the Kingdom of God, the person of Jesus, the miracles, the ethics of Jesus, the parables, and the passion and resurrection of Jesus are highlighted

This unit is worth 12 credit points.

NT008 (English) and NT009 (Greek) – The Synoptic Gospels

This is one of the exegetical units available in the New Testament field. Like all our advanced exegesis units it differs from the New Testament introduction units and Introduction to New Testament Greek in that it takes the knowledge and skills you have learnt and applies them at a deeper level.

You will learn to employ exegetical methods of modern critical study to read the Synoptic Gospels. For those who are studying this unit as a follow up to the study of New Testament Greek, you will find it very satisfying to put into practice what you have learned, and to see the fruit of all that study.

The unit will study a sample part of the Synoptic gospels – Luke 19-24. Within our selection of advanced exegesis units, this one focuses on the gospel accounts of the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Luke’s Gospel takes us straight to the person of Jesus Christ. In these chapters Luke cleverly uses his source material to reveal Jesus in a way that highlights important theological themes and both contrasts and compliments our knowledge of Jesus from the other gospels.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

TH025 – Principles of Systematic Theology

This preparatory half unit examines the importance of systematic theology, takes a bird’s eye view of Christian doctrine and gives the learner skills on ‘how to do theology’.

This unit is worth 6 credit points

CA-MIP B / PC106 – Pastoral Ministry in Practice B

Pastoral Ministry in Practice is based on the twin convictions that applying the gospel to ourselves is the foundation of all gospel ministry, and that the gospel must shape and drive all that we do in ministry.

The unit is designed to enable you to clarify and crystallize what you have learned during your course and to apply it to gospel ministry in a wise and considered way. You will be encouraged to articulate your own philosophy of ministry which draws on the full gamut of theological and biblical perspectives which you have garnered in your course to date. You will be expected to demonstrate how this is shaping your preaching as well as your thinking about all aspects of ministry.

Pastoral Ministry in Practice is usually taken in the final year of a four-year degree e.g., MDiv/GDDiv or BTh/BMin. It is compulsory for all Candidates for Ministry in the Presbyterian Church of Australia (PCA).

This unit is worth 6 credit points

CH006 – The Reformation

The unit The Reformation involves an in-depth study of  the Protestant Reformation of the Sixteenth Century in its historical context, with particular reference to developments in Germany, Switzerland, England & Scotland. It also devotes attention to the “Catholic Reformation” (or “Counter-Reformation”) of the same period. 

Some of the major personalities of the Reformation such as Luther, Calvin and Cranmer are studied in detail, together with how their lives, writings, and theology impacted on history. Some consideration is also given to the Radical Reformation and the Anabaptists, and the lessons to be learned from those movements. 

This unit is worth 12 credit points 

CH009 – History of Christianity in Australia

This unit looks at the history of Christianity in Australia, with particular reference to the Presbyterian and other evangelical churches. It also seeks to give students an understanding of where modern Australia has come from – and where it might be heading to. 

It aims to enable students to evaluate current developments in the life of the church and to apply insights from the past to address contemporary issues. The intention is that students will gain an increased understanding of the relationship between Christianity and Australian culture and society, and of how contemporary Australian Christianity and society in their current forms have emerged over time. 

As a result of taking this unit, students should be more aware of the real-world social context in which ministry in Australia happens, and have a better understanding of the background to and future trajectories of Australian Christianity. 

This unit is worth 12 credit points 

DE020 – Church-based children’s ministry

The unit Church-based Children’s Ministry examines biblical perspectives on children; critically analyses child development theories as they intersect with theological understandings of faith development in children; traces the history of children and the church; and examines dominant cultural influences on children. Key children’s ministry issues in the local church are then addressed – teaching and discipling children, the integration of children in the worshipping community; the spiritual nurture of children; evangelism of children; and the safety and care of children.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

LA004 – Biblical Hebrew B

This unit continues the introduction to Biblical Hebrew begun in LA003. The first half of the unit will be devoted to further study of morphology and syntax and the completion of a first-year Hebrew grammar. The second half of the  unit will comprise an orientation to the Hebrew Bible and translation of selected texts.

This unit is an elective unit, and worth 12 credit points.

LA006 – New Testament Greek B

This unit completes your introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of the New Testament and begins your introduction to the translation and exegesis of the New Testament. It is Part 2 of the basic building block of New Testament study. Like first semester language studies, it requires application and time, but I am sure that you will find it very rewarding.

This unit is worth 12 credit points.

OT014 (English) & OT015 (Hebrew) – Exilic Prophecy (Jeremiah)

Also OT206 (English) & OT207 (Hebrew) – Specialised Studies in OT: Exilic Prophecy (Jeremiah)

This unit will introduce students to the theology and significant texts of the book of Jeremiah, and its contribution to our overall understanding of the Bible. Two thirds of the unit (24 hours) will be devoted to lectures on the theology of the book. The remaining one third (12 hours) will comprise exegesis of set texts from Jeremiah.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

PC003 – Pastoral Skills and Methods

Pastoral Skills and Methods introduces students to the aims and methods of pastoral care and helps equip students to deliver pastoral care in a variety of situations which may arise in Ministry positions.

This unit is worth 12 credit points.

TH028 – Doctrine of Creation and Christ

The unit Doctrine of Creation & Christ: Exploring the Relationship involves an in-depth examination of the relationship between the doctrines of Creation, Humanity, Sin, and Providence on the one hand, and the person and work of Christ on the other.

This unit will enable students to work through in some depth the sources and content of Christian understandings of how the reality which God created, and which is now fallen, is related to the saving action of God that has taken place in Christ. It will provide training in articulating this relationship and applying it to life in the contemporary world and Christian ministry.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

CA-CRT22 – Westminster Confession of Faith

The unit Westminster Confession of Faith is designed to introduce students to the background and content of the Westminster Confession of Faith, the doctrinal standard of the Presbyterian Church of Australia (as subordinate to the Bible, the written Word of God). This unit will consider this statement of classic Reformed theology by first looking at the historical and theological background to the Confession and then examining the chapters of the WCF in turn.

This unit is not available for Academic credit

CA-MIP A / PC105 – Pastoral Ministry in Practice A

Pastoral Ministry in Practice is based on the twin convictions that applying the gospel to ourselves is the foundation of all gospel ministry, and that the gospel must shape and drive all that we do in ministry.

The unit is designed to enable you to clarify and crystallize what you have learned during your course and to apply it to gospel ministry in a wise and considered way. You will be encouraged to articulate your own philosophy of ministry which draws on the full gamut of theological and biblical perspectives which you have garnered in your course to date. You will be expected to demonstrate how this is shaping your preaching as well as your thinking about all aspects of ministry.

Pastoral Ministry in Practice is usually taken in the final year of a four-year degree e.g., MDiv/GDDiv or BTh/BMin. It is compulsory for all Candidates for Ministry in the Presbyterian Church of Australia (PCA).

This unit is worth 6 credit points

TH027 – The Corporate Dimension of the Gospel-Driven Life

The unit The Corporate Dimension of the Gospel-Driven Life is intended to equip students to articulate the relationship that exists between the nature of the church and the nature of the gospel and to apply this understanding to the practice of life in God’s household.

This involves examination into the different ways in which the church has been conceived and how that entails varying concepts of the gospel and of the relationship between them both. It will also entail exploring the way other theological topics shape one’s view of the body of Christ, and critically reflecting on the ecclesiological thought of one or two significant figures in the formation of a theological vision of the people of God as an articulation of the teaching of Scripture.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

CA-CRT21 – Presbyterian Polity

This unit is an introduction to the polity (church government) practised within the Presbyterian Church. The unit touches upon the Biblical principles and historical basis for Presbyterian Church government. However, this unit primarily focuses on how these Biblical and historical principles are used  to form Presbyterian Church government as practised within the Presbyterian Church of Australia. 

This unit is compulsory for candidates for the ministry of the Presbyterian Church of Australia, and an optional unit of secondary importance for other students. It will enhance the core units of your course by exploring one of the denominational distinctives of the Presbyterian Church of Australia. 

This unit is not available for academic credit for ACT qualifications.  

CH011 – History of Evangelical Christianity

Also CH206 – Specialised Studies in Church History: History of Evangelical Christianity 

The unit History of Evangelical Christianity gives an overview of modern Church History (since around 1700), with a particular focus on evangelicalism within Britain and the USA. Movements in continental Europe are also given some attention where they have had a major impact on the English speaking world. Some key Christian figures of the period are studied in depth, along with their theology and writings. Related developments in Australia are also considered to help students connect wider happenings with their own context, although only briefly, as an entire unit is devoted to the history of Christianity in Australia elsewhere in the QTC curriculum (CH009). 

This unity is worth 12 credit points 

NT024 (English) and NT025 (Greek) – Other Writings (Philippians and 1 Peter)

Also NT206 (English) and NT207 (Greek) – Specialised Studies in New Testament: Other Writings (Philippians and 1 Peter)

This unit is intended to give students a firm grasp on two key letters of the New Testament: Philippians and 1 Peter. These are central texts of the New Testament and Christianity. The unit provides detailed study of selected passages from these texts, along with an examination of the teaching and purpose of the letters as a whole. For those studying the Greek text, your skills in Greek exegesis will be extended. For those studying the English text, a wider breadth of the letters will be covered.

This unit contributes to the course by examining two letters which address topics that are not covered so directly in other parts of the New Testament, namely Philippians and 1 Peter. Joy, Suffering, Salvation, Exile, and the fulfillment and culmination of God’s promises in Jesus are all themes that these two epistles share though they are developed in their own unique ways as we will see. These issues and others deal with biblical-theological themes which stretch all the way back to Genesis and are at the heart of the gospel message that both Peter and Paul expound in their own way. It has therefore been chosen by QTC as an important unit of study and one suitable for introducing the student to the work of one of the New Testament’s major writers.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

OT010 (English) and OT011 (Hebrew) – Former Prophets (1&2 Samuel)

Also OT206 (English) and OT207 (Hebrew) – Specialised Studies in Old Testament: Former Prophets

This unit will introduce students to the theology and significant texts of 1 and 2 Samuel. Two-thirds of this unit (26 hours) will be devoted to studying the unfolding story and theology of these two books. The remaining third (13 hours) will comprise exegesis of set texts from 1 and 2 Samuel.

1 and 2 Samuel play an important role in the unfolding history of redemption. Central biblical theological topics like Kingship, the Ark of the Covenant, and Temple are introduced and/or developed in these books. Moreover, it can be argued that unless students grasp the message of 1 and 2 Samuel, this will result in a truncated understanding of the Gospel.

This unit, then, is a fundamental part of your course. It is designed to enable you to grapple with both the details of the text and the grand themes which dominate 1 and 2 Samuel as a literary work. The unit will endeavour to enable you to read these two books sensitively, and to think through the implications of the theological issues which they raise.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

PC004 – Christian Worship

There are few subjects which provoke such strong reactions among Christians in Australia today as ‘worship’ – arguments rage over what it is, whether we can use the category to describe what goes on when we meet together and, of course, what is appropriate for God’s people to sing and do when we get together.

This unit aims to set today’s vital discussions in the context of a biblical theology of worship and a rich understanding of the debates and choices which have shaped the thinking of the church of Christ through history, with a special focus on the Reformation tradition and more recent developments here in Australia. As well as biblical and theological input from the QTC Faculty, students will have the opportunity to hear from an experienced and diverse selection of key pastors within our constituency, and to visit and reflect on practice in a church outside their own tradition.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

PE007 – Christian Apologetics

This unit is designed to help students explore and develop proficiency in the discipline of Christian apologetics, the task of defending the Christian faith from attacks and commending it against rival claimants.

This involves examination of the biblical and theological foundations for apologetics, philosophical issues regarding the nature of truth and when there is epistemological warrant for beliefs, and some awareness of the history of apologetics throughout the centuries. From there the unit will consider the arguments for and against the major ‘schools’ or approaches to apologetics in the current era so that students may make an informed decision as to which approach best commends the gospel on its own terms.

With this framework in place, the unit will then turn to the various classical arguments for the existence of God from natural theology, arguments for the Christian faith arising from Scripture’s claims, understanding the nature of various critiques on Christian claims and responses that have been made to these, as well as critical interaction with some of the main alternatives to Christianity.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

TH101 – The Knowledge and Doctrine of God

Also TH206-912 – Specialised Studies in Theology: The Knowledge and Doctrine of God

The unit The Knowledge and Doctrine of God is designed to introduce students to those doctrines which deal with how the Christian God acts to reveal himself and the knowledge of God that results from these acts.

This involves examination of the issues involving the nature of theology as a discipline, as well as the nature and purpose of human knowledge of God, the distinction between general revelation and special revelation, and the role and nature of the word of God as gospel and as Scripture, including such categories as authority, inspiration, trustworthiness, clarity, interpretation and canon.

It is also involves examination into the knowledge of God that revelation actually gives us— what can we say about the God that we know? This entails forays into the nature and identity of the Christian God including the doctrine of the Trinity and God’s attributes. This unit will consider these fundamental Christian teachings as they are presented in the Scriptures of the Old & New Testaments, and in light of debates and insights past and present.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

EM018 – Ministry in a Culturally Diverse Context

Modern Australia’s diverse society means that those in ministry are guaranteed to encounter other cultures. Whether we are fathers, mothers, sons or daughters, students from overseas, refugees or asylum seekers, Australian, Iranian, Chinese, Korean or from other parts of the globe, Revelation chapter 5 says that Christ lived, died, and rose again to “ransom people for God from every tribe and language and people and nation”.

This unit addresses questions of ethnicity and identity, cultural sensitivity and the challenges and opportunities associated with Ministry in a Diverse Context. This unit will be of great benefit to students planning to serve in a variety of ministry roles, whether in Australia or overseas, with a particular emphasis on how multi-ethnicity shapes the exercise of local church.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

PE002 – Theological Ethics

This unit will begin by considering biblical and theological ethics, including various hermeneutical issues which commonly come up as Christians and churches seek to frame their approaches to ethical matters. The major non-Christian approaches to ethics (“philosophical ethics”) will then be briefly surveyed, to increase critical understanding of how the non-Christian world we live in and interact with thinks about ethics. 

The second half of the Semester will be devoted to the consideration of a number of important ethical issues, including the family, money, wealth, work, and start of life and end of life issues such as abortion, contraception, and voluntary assisted dying. Unfortunately , in one Semester we cannot even cover all of the really critical issues, let alone others that are relatively common in some contexts, however the issues we will study can be taken as examples of how to handle other ethical questions that may arise in your life and ministry. 

This unit is worth 12 credit points 

PC127 – Expository Preaching in Practice

This unit offers a practical, hands-on introduction to Biblical Preaching. The unit looks at the skills that are essential in clearly proclaiming Christ from all the Scriptures to a contemporary audience. Students will be required to think theologically about preaching, to clarify their own philosophy of ministry in this area, before moving on to work on preparing and delivering an engaging Bible talk.

This unit is worth 6 credit points

OT020 (English) & OT021 (Hebrew) – The Psalter

Also OT206 (English) and OT207 (Hebrew) – Specialised studies in Theology: The Psalter

This unit will introduce students to the genres, poetry, themes theology and significant texts of the Psalter. Two thirds of the course (26 hours) will be devoted to lectures on the theology of the book. The remaining one third (13 hours) will comprise exegesis of set texts from specific psalms.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

NT055 (English) and NT056 (Greek) – The Person and Work of Christ in John’s Gospel

This is one of the exegetical units available in the New Testament field. Like all our advanced exegesis units it differs from the New Testament introduction units and Introduction to New Testament Greek in that it takes the knowledge and skills you have learnt and applies them at a deeper level. You will learn to employ exegetical methods to read John’s Gospel; methods such as literary criticism and biblical theological interpretation, alongside traditional approaches of grammatical, historical critical theory and systematic theological integration. For those who are studying this unit as a follow up to the study of New Testament Greek, you will find it very satisfying to put into practice what you have learned, and to see the fruit of all that study.

The content of this unit will explore John’s gospel through two key theological concepts Christology and Faith. In his prologue (1:1-18) and purpose statement (20:31), John himself tells us that these concepts drive this gospel. A number of other themes will be examined under these topics. The intention is to give appropriate attention to the way in which John presents Christ as the fulfilment of multiple Old Testament images, develops Christological teaching, and to how he communicates regarding these specific themes through multiple evocative metaphors. The focus on the theological topic of Faith will encourage students to apply their exegesis to life and ministry.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

LA005 – New Testament Greek A

The books of the New Testament were originally written in the lingua franca (Trade Language) of the time, Koine Greek (Common Greek). This is one of the “ancestors” of the Greek language spoken today. Students will study a basic introductory grammar of New Testament Greek, and early on will commence reading the Greek New Testament, which as the unit progresses, they will be able to increasingly understand.

Biblical languages are critical for responsible and insightful exegesis and exegesis is the foundation of all good Biblical and Systematic theology. This unit opens up the world of the New Testament in a way that is both interesting and vital for students of the Bible. It is the basic building block of New Testament study. Like all language studies it requires application and time, but I am sure that you will find it very rewarding.

Note: Before Semester 1 starts, there is a Language Intensive Week that is compulsory for all LA005 students.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

LA003 – Biblical Hebrew A

This unit comprises an introduction to Biblical Hebrew which will be continued in LA004612/812 in Semester 2. The unit will be devoted to study of morphology and syntax and completion of approximately half of a first-year Hebrew grammar.

Note: Before Semester 1 starts, there is a Language Intensive Week that is compulsory for all LA003 students.

This unit is worth 12 credit points

OT001 – Old Testament Foundations

Old Testament Foundations (OT001) amd Old Testament Prophets and Writings (OT002) form the foundation upon which all further study of the Old Testament builds. They are thus concerned not so much with the critical issues of Old Testament studies, as with the biblical history as it is recorded in the Old Testament. The study is undertaken in the light of the various ancient contexts of the biblical narrative, illustrated by modern archaeological findings.

This unit will introduce students to key features of the contents and background of the Pentateuch (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy) and the Former Prophets (Joshua, Judges, 1–2 Samuel, and 1–2 Kings).

This unit is worth 12 Credit Points.